UNCONVENTIONAL SOFTWARE PRACTICES - 2018/9

Module code: COM3021

Module Overview

A series of lectures will be given by a range of IT professionals, in person, broadcast over the internet, or provided in recorded form for self-paced learning through e-skills (so-called Guru Lectures of the Software Development for Business programme). The purpose of these lectures is to share industry experiences, address case studies, and generally to evaluate the evolution of products, practices and perspectives in Software Development. The lectures will be used to form the topics for follow-up discussions and for specific assessments centred on the benefits and drawbacks of conventional and unconventional practices.

 

The 'guru' lectures will be co-ordinated by e-skills for the SDB programme, and either hosted at Surrey or webcast to Surrey. Further gurus from local industry may be brought in from time to time on specific topics.

Module provider

Computer Science

Module Leader

Number of Credits: 15

ECTS Credits: 7.5

Framework: FHEQ Level 6

JACs code:

Module cap (Maximum number of students): N/A

Module Availability

Semester 1

Prerequisites / Co-requisites

N/A

Module content

The lecture content will vary both as practices shift and with individual speakers. Indicative content includes:



Formal and informal industrial practices and best practice as deisrable but emergent


Retrofitting new practices for old systems


Opportunity spotting in technology trends, and the risks of early adoption


Overcoming difficulties in adoption of cutting-edge systems


Evaluations and critiques of new technologies and techniques


Patent search for competive gain and avoidance of costly legal challenges


Implementing international standards – conformity and compliance


Assessment pattern

Assessment type Unit of assessment Weighting
Coursework Lecture Evaluation 40
Coursework Topic-oriented Essay 60

Alternative Assessment

N/A

Assessment Strategy

The assessment strategy is designed to provide students with the opportunity to demonstrate



Their understanding of the importance of active participation with both their learning and with understanding how products, practices and perspectives change in Software Development


Their novel insights into the past and present of Software Development approaches


How they engage with wider industry knowledge.


How they have developed broad knowledge of new ideas, developments and practices.



 

Thus, the summative assessment for this module consists of:



Lecture evaluation, an individual 1500 word synthesis of a selection of lectures from the first 6 weeks (any 3 of 5), structured for submission around week 8 to allow for feedback to be formative for the second assessment. This addresses all LOs.


Topic-oriented essay, an individual 2500 word focussed evaluation of a specific topic selected from the set of topics covered by the lectures or provided as a case study, for submission around week 11. This addresses all LOs and is summative only.



 

Formative assessment and feedback

Formative feedback is provided as part of the essay-based assessment as well being informally obtained through extensive class discussions and any individual follow-up subsequently.

Module aims

  • Encourage a participative approach in understanding and critique of the evolution of products, practices and perspectives in Software Development
  • Offer novel insights into present and past Software Development approaches
  • Offer opportunities for engagement between students and industry
  • Reinforce the professional importance of maintaining broad knowledge of new ideas, developments and practices.

Learning outcomes

Attributes Developed
001 Communicate clearly and unambiguously about a range of industry practices and challenges PT
002 Understand and reflect upon how practices evolve over time and be able to identify the key pressures and motivators of change KC
003 Evaluate industrial approaches and be able to identify and elaborate opportunities for improvement CPT
004 Propose and defend solutions grounded in both international and industry standards KCP
005 Gather, analyse, and evaluate information from a range of sources CT

Attributes Developed

C - Cognitive/analytical

K - Subject knowledge

T - Transferable skills

P - Professional/Practical skills

Overall student workload

Independent Study Hours: 128

Lecture Hours: 22

Methods of Teaching / Learning

The learning and teaching strategy is designed to:



Help students to understand the importance of active participation with both their learning and with understanding how products, practices and perspectives change in Software Development


Provide students with novel insights into the past and present of Software Development approaches


Provide the students with opportunities to demonstrate engagement with wider industry knowledge.


Encourage students to maintain broad knowledge of new ideas, developments and practices.



 

The learning and teaching methods include:



Lectures (11 weeks, 2 hours/week) including class discussions


Indicated Lecture Hours (which may also include seminars, tutorials, workshops and other contact time) are approximate and may include in-class tests where one or more of these are an assessment on the module. In-class tests are scheduled/organised separately to taught content and will be published on to student personal timetables, where they apply to taken modules, as soon as they are finalised by central administration. This will usually be after the initial publication of the teaching timetable for the relevant semester.

Reading list

Reading list for UNCONVENTIONAL SOFTWARE PRACTICES :

Please note that the information detailed within this record is accurate at the time of publishing and may be subject to change. This record contains information for the most up to date version of the programme / module for the 2018/9 academic year.