SOLID STATE PHYSICS - 2024/5

Module code: PHY2068

Module Overview

This module has two independent halves, on crystallography and on optical applications of solids.

- The crystallography half-module will describe crystal structures, crystalline lattices and their study with X-rays. It will introduce the concept of quantisation of lattice vibrations (phonons).

- The optical applications half-module will describe band theory of solids, how it can be controlled, and how it affects the absorption, reflection, propagation, emission from molecules to nano-materials to bulk solids. Modern optical and photonic devices such as semiconductor lasers, solar cells, nuclear radiation detectors and quantum computer qubits will be introduced.

Module provider

Mathematics & Physics

Module Leader

SELLIN Paul (Maths & Phys)

Number of Credits: 15

ECTS Credits: 7.5

Framework: FHEQ Level 5

Module cap (Maximum number of students): N/A

Overall student workload

Independent Learning Hours: 49

Lecture Hours: 22

Tutorial Hours: 11

Laboratory Hours: 24

Guided Learning: 22

Captured Content: 22

Module Availability

Semester 1

Prerequisites / Co-requisites

None.

Module content

Indicative content for the Crystallography and X-ray part:


  • - Crystal structure: Unit cells, translation and primitive lattice vectors. Wigner-Seitz cells, HCP, FCC, BCC and the basis.

  • - XRD: The reciprocal lattice, Bragg reflection and Laue X-ray diffraction, structure factors. Ewald Sphere.

  • - Lattice defects and dynamics: Defects in crystals. Concept of phonons and phonon modes. Vibrations in diatomic lattice (acoustical and optical modes)



Indicative content for the Optical Applications in Solid State Physics part:


  • Optical properties of solids: Band theory of solids, interband transitions in semiconductors and insulators, photodiodes and solar cells. Luminescence, LEDs and lasers. Quantum confinement: wells wires and dots.

  • - Free Electrons: Metals, doped semiconductors and the Drude-Lorentz model. Plasmons, and negative refraction.

  • - Molecular materials and colour centres: Organic optoelectronics. Buckminster-fullerene, graphene and carbon nanotubes. NV centres in diamond. Rare Earth ions.


Assessment pattern

Assessment type Unit of assessment Weighting
Practical based assessment LABORATORY DIARY & REPORT/PRESENTATION 30
Examination End of Semester Examination - 2 hours 70

Alternative Assessment

N/A

Assessment Strategy

The assessment strategy is designed to provide students with the opportunity to demonstrate:


  • Practical skills are assessed from presentations, reports and diaries produced in laboratories (Learning Outcome 5)

  • Skills in applying subject knowledge and understanding are assessed with an end-of-semester exam (learning outcomes 1-4).



Formative assessment:


  • Problem sets are provided during the weekly 1-hour tutorial on solid state physics, together with model answers to these questions, which allow the students to test their understanding of course material.



Feedback:


  • Verbal feedback on progress will be provided during tutorial classes.

  • Continuous formative feedback is provided in laboratory classes from demonstrators and academic staff (including the formative and summative assessment mentioned above).


Module aims

  • To develop key concepts in solid-state physics including crystal structure, lattices and the idea of reciprocal space (Crystals).
  • To apply these concepts to X-ray Diffraction as a means to study the structure of matter (Crystals).
  • To develop band theory of solids, including the difference between metals, insulators and semiconductors, and to show how semiconductors and other materials play a pivotal role in modern electronic and photonic devices (Applications).
  • To describe modern device technologies that involve electronic and photonic materials (Applications).
  • Laboratory classes will be used to reinforce concepts developed in the lectures and will be used to further develop and enhance laboratory skills, particularly in the area of analysis and spectroscopy (Crystals and Applications).

Learning outcomes

Attributes Developed
001 Understand different types of crystal structure (Crystals) C
002 Describe modes of vibration in a crystal lattice (Crystals) K
003 Solve problems in the band theory of solids (Applications) CP
004 Explain the differences between metals, insulators and conductors, and how these differences may be applied in technology (Applications) KCP
005 Demonstrate practical ability to obtain important parameters describing crystals and solids from experiment (Crystals and Applications) KCPT

Attributes Developed

C - Cognitive/analytical

K - Subject knowledge

T - Transferable skills

P - Professional/Practical skills

Methods of Teaching / Learning

The learning and teaching strategy is designed to:


  • equip students with subject knowledge

  • develop skills in applying subject knowledge to physical situations

  • enable students to tackle unseen problems in solid state physics

  • advance students' practical skills



The learning and teaching methods include:


  • Lecture-based classes to cover key theoretical concepts within the module

  • Experimental laboratory classes in which students implement ideas from the lecture-based classes


Indicated Lecture Hours (which may also include seminars, tutorials, workshops and other contact time) are approximate and may include in-class tests where one or more of these are an assessment on the module. In-class tests are scheduled/organised separately to taught content and will be published on to student personal timetables, where they apply to taken modules, as soon as they are finalised by central administration. This will usually be after the initial publication of the teaching timetable for the relevant semester.

Reading list

https://readinglists.surrey.ac.uk
Upon accessing the reading list, please search for the module using the module code: PHY2068

Other information

The School of Mathematics and Physics is committed to developing graduates with strengths in Employability, Digital Capabilities, Global and Cultural Capabilities, Sustainability, and Resourcefulness and Resilience. This module is designed to allow students to develop knowledge, skills, and capabilities in the following areas:

Sustainability Modern technology and devices have the capability to consume significant resources in construction, and energy during use, and the course will expose students to the ways in which these problems may occur. Technology can also be a major part of the solution, and students will be given understanding of the principles and design of photovoltaic solar cells and thermoelectrics.

Digital Capabilities This module trains students in the devices that power the information revolution: both electronic devices, photonic devices, and also future quantum technology devices.

Programmes this module appears in

Programme Semester Classification Qualifying conditions
Physics with Astronomy BSc (Hons) 1 Compulsory A weighted aggregate mark of 40% is required to pass the module
Physics BSc (Hons) 1 Compulsory A weighted aggregate mark of 40% is required to pass the module
Physics with Nuclear Astrophysics BSc (Hons) 1 Compulsory A weighted aggregate mark of 40% is required to pass the module
Physics with Quantum Computing BSc (Hons) 1 Optional A weighted aggregate mark of 40% is required to pass the module
Physics with Nuclear Astrophysics MPhys 1 Compulsory A weighted aggregate mark of 40% is required to pass the module
Physics with Astronomy MPhys 1 Compulsory A weighted aggregate mark of 40% is required to pass the module
Physics MPhys 1 Compulsory A weighted aggregate mark of 40% is required to pass the module
Physics with Quantum Computing MPhys 1 Compulsory A weighted aggregate mark of 40% is required to pass the module

Please note that the information detailed within this record is accurate at the time of publishing and may be subject to change. This record contains information for the most up to date version of the programme / module for the 2024/5 academic year.