GRADUATE ENTRY MEDICINE YEAR 1 - 2025/6

Module code: MED2001

Module Overview

In the first year of the Graduate Entry Medicine programme students will start to acquire the knowledge and skills that underpin modern medical practice. Following completion of a systems based foundational preparatory e-learning course, students will work across three integrated assessment themes: Medical Knowledge, Clinical Practice and Special Study Units. Learning will take place in a variety of small groups, including those where problem-based learning will be utilised as a tool to develop knowledge and teamwork. These sessions will be supported by a programme of large group lectures. Students will be provided with ample opportunity to apply and practice their knowledge and skills, working closely with professionals in the Surrey Clinical Simulation Centre (SC2), anatomy facilities at the Minimal Access Therapy Training Unit (MATTU), and while on clinical placement. Students will learn and demonstrate fifteen clinical competencies this year as part of the Clinical Practice theme some of which will be undertaken with real patients, whilst on placement within a GP practice. Students will undertake several Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) which requires taking a history from a patient/simulated patient, completing an examination, and performing a practical skill. Professional Development Groups will provide a supportive environment in which students can acquire deeper learning from placement experiences and explore what it means to be a medical professional. Students will also complete two summative Special Study Units (SSUs) in the themes of Social Science & Medical Humanities and Healthcare in Practice.

Module provider

Medicine

Module Leader

WRIGHT Juliet (Medicine)

Number of Credits: 165

ECTS Credits: 82.5

Framework: FHEQ Level 5

Module cap (Maximum number of students): 40

Overall student workload

Workshop Hours: 48

Clinical Placement Hours: 72

Independent Learning Hours: 989

Lecture Hours: 99

Seminar Hours: 72

Tutorial Hours: 160

Practical/Performance Hours: 162

Captured Content: 48

Module Availability

Year long

Prerequisites / Co-requisites

None

Module content

Year 1 of the Graduate Entry Medicine programme is based over nine clinical themes.

Host Defence, Movement and Control, Oxygen Supply and Exchange, Metabolism, Development, Carcinogenesis, The Mind, Ageing and Staying Well.

These themes will be delivered by subject specialists via large group lectures, life sciences tutorials including 3D anatomy teaching, enhanced with longitudinal problem based clinical cases and relevant clinical skills teaching both in simulation and on placement. Students will be supported by regular formative assessments. Students also have a structured small group personal development programme.

Each theme lasts 3 weeks.

This programme follows completion of a systems based foundational preparatory e-learning course, covering the themes; musculoskeletal system, immune and lymphatic system, nervous system, endocrine and reproductive systems, respiratory systems, cardiovascular system, renal system, gastrointestinal system. The foundation programme is followed by an induction week of orientation activities and an introductory consolidation block of learning leading into year 1 and a spiral curriculum of learning. This extended academic year of learning concludes with a final two-week study unit to aid transition into the Clinical Pathways 1 module.

In each theme learning will centred around a medical scenario that will be explored within a Problem Based Learning (PBL) group and supported by learning in lectures, the Surrey Clinical Simulation Centre (SC2), anatomy facilities at the Minimal Access Therapy Training Unit (MATTU), on clinical placements and in Professional Development Groups (PDG). In SSU weeks students will work to a schedule proposed by the SSU facilitator, exploring a topic of their choice in more depth and learning core research skills. The academic content of the module is aligned with the outcomes as specified by the GMC within Outcomes for Graduates 2018:

Outcome 1: Professional Values and Behaviours

Professional and ethical responsibilities

Legal responsibilities

Patient safety and quality improvement

Dealing with complexity and uncertainty

Safeguarding vulnerable patients

Leadership and team working

Outcome 2: Professional Skills

Communication and interpersonal skills

Diagnosis and medical management

Prescribing medications safely

Using information effectively and safely

Outcome 3: Professional Knowledge

The health service and healthcare systems in the four countries

Applying biomedical scientific principles

Applying psychological principles

Applying social science principles

Health promotion and illness prevention

Clinical research and scholarship

 

Assessment pattern

Assessment type Unit of assessment Weighting
Examination Medical Knowledge Examination Pass/Fail
Practical based assessment OSCEs Pass/Fail
Coursework Social Science and Medical Humanities and Healthcare in Practice Special Study Unit Reports (SSU) Pass/Fail
Practical based assessment Fitness to Practise Pass/Fail

Alternative Assessment

None

Assessment Strategy

The assessment strategy is designed to provide students with the opportunity to demonstrate the acquisition of the applied knowledge, clinical and professional skills required to graduate with a primary medical qualification in the UK. Students must demonstrate competence and knowledge which will assure patient safety in the clinical setting.

Thus, the summative assessment for this module consists of:


  • Medical Knowledge Examinations

  • Observed Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs)

  • Special Study Units (SSUs)

  • Fitness to Practise



Medical Knowledge Examinations:

1 x Mid Year Test (25%) and 1 x End of Year Test (75%)

Learning outcomes tested:1-4, 6, 8-9, 11- 12


  • The Mid-Year 1 examination consists of 50 questions in 1 hour 20 minutes for standard time students.

  • The End of Year 1 examination consists of 100 questions in 2 hours 45 minutes for standard time students.

  • Passing standards for the Mid-Year and End of Year 1 Examinations are set by a panel of academic curriculum content experts and clinicians following an Angoff process.

  • Following each assessment, a post-examination review will be conducted.

  • The Mid-Year and End of Year 1 Examinations shall be weighted 25% / 75% respectively and marks will be standardised to allow a for a final pass mark and progression decision to be made.

  • If a student misses the Mid-Year examination with valid mitigation the End of Year 1 examination will carry a 100% weighting. If a student misses the End of Year 1 examination with valid mitigation, they will be required to attend a deferred examination.




  • If a student misses either the Mid-Year or End of Year 1 examination without valid mitigation, they will receive a score of zero for that missing assessment.

  • Any student who does not achieve a satisfactory grade in the Mid-Year examination will be offered progress support.

  • A student who fails to meet the overall passing standard for the Medical Knowledge theme will be offered a re-sit examination in, which will carry a 100% weighting.

  • Individual student feedback will show performance within individual disciplines and comparison with overall cohort scoring.



Observed Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs):

Learning outcomes tested: 1-10, 12-16

An OSCE examination comprises 4 stations, each station length will be 15 mins


  • Students in year one will undertake three OSCEs.

  • A fourth OSCE towards the end of the year will be available for students requiring it.

  • These OSCEs will be comprised of four stations based on the clinical skills taught curriculum. Students will be given feedback on their performance at the end of each term.

  • Student performance within the OSCE is observed at each station by trained assessors and students are awarded a score by each assessor against a station specific checklist.

  • Assessors also rate student performance at a station globally on a Likert scale as clear fail; borderline; clear pass; very good or outstanding.

  • A standard is then calculated for each station using a borderline regression (BR) method, making use of the checklist scores and the global ratings. This method uses the data of the complete group of examinees and assessors for a station.

  • A student’s overall score for the OSCE is calculated by aggregating all station scores.

  • All stations in the OSCE are equally weighted.

  • The overall standard for an OSCE is calculated by combining scores from all stations in the OSCE. In order to meet the passing standard for a termly OSCE, a student’s overall aggregated score for all assessed stations must exceed the cut score derived from all stations in the assessment. Students who do not meet the passing standard in a termly OSCE will be informed and offered remediation by clinical skills tutors.

  • Students who do not meet the standard in two or more independent OSCE stations in a termly OSCE will be informed of this and advised to seek remediation support in clinical skills through self-directed learning.

  • Where remediation identifies issues with additional learning or support needs, the student will be referred to their tutor.

  • Where a student does not meet the standard at two out of three termly OSCEs they will be required to take the fourth OSCE.

  • Where a student does not meet the standard at all three termly OSCEs they will have not met the minimum standard for progression.

  • Students who are unable to attend a termly OSCE due to illness/other mitigating circumstances will be required to take the fourth OSCE.



To pass the year in this theme, a student must have attempted three and successfully met the standard in at least two OSCEs AND successfully met the passing standard in at least 8 individual stations regardless of any mitigating circumstances.

Students who have not met the required standard to pass the year after the first three OSCEs must meet the standard at the fourth OSCE to pass the year in this theme.

OSCE Ranking and Overall Grades


  • At the end of the year a student’s overall score for the OSCE theme is calculated by aggregating standardised scores from each of the first three OSCEs completed by the student.

  • Students are then ranked by their standardised scores.

  • Excellent performance in the OSCE is defined as an overall score within the top 10% of scores in the cohort.

  • Satisfactory performance is achieved by passing the standard in two or more OSCEs and meeting the standard in at least 8 stations in the year.

  • A student who did not meet the passing standard after three OSCEs but did achieve the passing standard after the fourth OSCE will be awarded a ‘Satisfactory’ grade.

  • Unsatisfactory performance is determined by failing to meet the passing standard in three OSCEs or failing to meet the passing standard in at least 8 stations in the year.

  • If a student is unsatisfactory and has not reached the passing standard, the student will be deemed to have failed the clinical practice theme.



Special Study Units (SSUs)

Social Science & Medical Humanities and Healthcare in Practice Special Study Unit Reports

Learning Outcomes tested - 1-4, 7, 11-16

2 x 2000 word written reports

Pass/fail decision

Individual student feedback - score and written feedback


  • The SSU projects are divided into themes and the assessment aims to be authentic and reflect the nature of the topic.

  • The first SSU of Year One is a formative attempt with a student-selected choice of question within a given theme. Students must attempt the formative SSU in order to pass the year.

  • Within year one there are 2 further summative 3-week SSU blocks.

  • Details of the criteria and the grading process will be provided within the appropriate SSU theme handbook.

  • While students may be encouraged to work in groups, an individual assessment must be provided, with joint submissions not permitted.

  • Any student repeating a year will not be permitted to submit SSU reports from previous academic years.

  • Students must complete one formative and two summative SSUs during Year One,

  • Each individual SSU will be graded as a pass or fail using a post-test standard-setting procedure.



This will be achieved as follows:


  • Grade descriptors will be provided for each section (to both students and assessors) and assessors will rate each section of the SSU separately on a scale of 0 – 4 (where 0 = Not present, 1 = Unsatisfactory, 2 = Borderline, 3 = Satisfactory and 4 = Excellent) using whole marks and give written feedback.

  • These section scores will be added together to produce a total score for the SSU.



Late submissions


  • Late submission is as per University of Surrey regulations, repeated concerns regarding late submissions may be subject to consideration by the Medical Student Concerns and Support Committee (MSCSC).

  • Failure to submit all the required SSU assessment elements within the academic year will result in failing the SSU theme.



Overall grades for the SSU assessment theme will be determined as follows:


  • An overall Excellent SSU assessment theme grade will be awarded to any student who has obtained passing scores for each individual summative SSU they have undertaken and also has a total standardised score which falls within the top 10% of their cohort.

  • The student should not have been required to make any resubmissions or any late submissions (unless supported by valid mitigation) during the year.

  • An overall Unsatisfactory SSU theme grade will be awarded to any student who has failed to reach a passing score in both summative SSU themes.

  • One resubmission attempt is permitted in the referral/deferral assessment period if required to demonstrate satisfactory performance. This will be assessed by a different member of staff to that who provided any progress support.

  • Students who fail this resubmission will be deemed to have failed the SSU theme.

  • Students who fail both summative SSU themes will also be deemed to have failed the SSU theme and will not be able to resubmit. 

  • All students failing to reach the passing score for an individual SSU will be offered progress support.



Fitness to Practise

The Fitness to Practise Panel in accordance with all written and verbal feedback in accordance University of Surrey Policy and Procedures for Fitness to Practise will consider/determine the Fitness to Practise of each student as follows:


  • Fit to Practise

  • Fitness to Practise in Question & Subject to Review

  • Not Fit to Practise



Any student deemed “Not Fit to Practise” medicine in accordance with University of Surrey Policy and Procedures for Fitness to Practise will not be able to progress on the medical degree programme.

Professionalism Judgements (PJs)


  • 15 compulsory judgements are required from a variety of assessors based on observations of professional behaviours in scheduled teaching sessions.

  • In addition, 3 termly Professionalism Judgements for attendance may be given as detailed in the Attendance Policy.

  • Additionally, 'On the Spot' Professionalism feedback can be given at any point and contribute to an extra Professionalism Judgement.

  • These judgements may trigger a Fitness to Practise enquiry and therefore may have significant implications on student progression.



In accordance with the attendance policy students are required to attend the following.

The marks/scores in the assessments do not contribute to the module marks but attendance will be recorded.


  • Formative Mini Knowledge Tests

  • Formative Applied Medical Knowledge Examination

  • Formative OSCEs

  • Formative Special Study Unit (SSU1; first SSU of Year) Report



Formative Mini Knowledge Tests


  • Learning Outcomes addressed: 1-4, 6, 8-9, 11- 12

  • Online end of study unit test to be undertaken independently by student in own time

  • Online feedback



Formative Applied Medical Knowledge Examination


  • Learning outcomes addressed: 1-4, 6, 8-9, 11- 12

  • 2 papers taken at approximately week 10 and week 32

  • Each paper will be a  3 hour online multiple-choice paper of 125 questions (in blocks of 25)



Formative OSCEs


  • Students in year one will undertake two formative assessments within their General Practice Placements.

  • These assessments are designed as a form of immersive OSCE style station. Students are expected to arrange to complete the assessments during their scheduled half day placements.

  • Failure to complete these formative assessments without appropriate mitigation may result in negative on the spot feedback being awarded.



Formative feedback on clinical competence


  • Learning outcomes addressed: 1-10, 12-16

  • Observed during sessions in the Clinical Skills Centre and during clinical placements

  • Verbal feedback



Formative Special Study Unit (SSU1; first SSU of Year) Report


  • Learning outcomes addressed: 1-4, 7, 11-16

  • 2000 word written report

  • score and written feedback available



Feedback

Students will receive a range of feedback on their academic, clinical and consulting skills and professional performance; this will be verbal and in writing (electronically via the virtual learning environment, SurreyLearn).  Formative assessments will particularly concentrate on giving rapid and constructive feedback. Students will also receive written feedback from summative assessments.  Feedback will provide data to teachers to inform the development of practice. Where examiners and/or patients/role players have given written feedback on clinical performance this will be given back to students. Students will be encouraged to peer review each other’s contributions to Case Based Learning and other group learning activities.

How to pass the module:


  • Students must pass each of the four forms of assessment in the summative assessment list and be deemed “Fit to Practise” or “Fitness to Practise in Question & Subject to Review” by the Fitness to Practise Panel in order to pass this module, and therefore progress to the next year of the programme.

  • There is no compensation between the different themes/forms of summative assessment.

  • Students must meet the attendance requirement for all formative assessments.

  • Students cannot progress to the next year unless all year 1 credit is achieved.



Students who fail to reach an aggregated pass for any overarching assessment theme (Medical Knowledge, Clinical Practice or Special Study Units), will fail the module overall and are therefore dealt with as referred students, and are given the opportunity to be re-assessed for this module in the following academic year. Referred students must repeat all teaching and assessment in the following academic year and must gain a pass through their aggregated scores for all overarching assessments (Medical Knowledge, Clinical Practice and Special Study Units) and be deemed “Fit to Practise” or “Fitness to Practise in Question & Subject to Review” to pass the module in their referred year. Students have one opportunity for referral after which if they do not progress they will usually be required to leave the programme.

 

Module aims

  • This module focusses on three integrated areas of study that will allow students to acquire and demonstrate the knowledge, skills and behaviours that are expected of a medical student, and that underpin modern clinical and academic practice. The aims of the three areas of study are outlined, as follows.
  • Medical Knowledge Students will be taught how to demonstrate the integrated application of the medical sciences (biomedical, psychological, sociological and population health) that underpin medical practice.
  • Clinical Practice Students will develop core skills in clinical history taking, examination and diagnosis. Students will become competent in managing initial responses to the common emergency clinical situations.
  • Special Study Units (SSUs) Students will develop academic skills that are relevant to a clinical environment, including an introduction to research, critical thinking, written and verbal communication. Students will be encouraged to identify important questions about medical practice and study in-depth an area of interest that is relevant to healthcare in practice as well as social sciences and medical humanities, as these relate to modern clinical practice.
  • Professionalism and Fitness to Practise In addition to these three integrated assessment themes students will be supported in the acquisition of professional and ethical behaviours and skills, with person-centred and patient-centred approaches relating to their development in reflective practice, team working, time-management, issues of consent, and giving and receiving feedback; as required by the General Medical Council. GMC Good Medical Practice (2019). Duties of a doctor registered with the GMC.

Learning outcomes

Attributes Developed
001 Apply to medical practice the biomedical scientific principles, method and knowledge, as appropriate for this level of study (Outcome 3, Point 22 in Outcomes for Graduates (General Medical Council) 2018). KCPT
002 Apply psychological principles, method and knowledge to medical practice, as appropriate for this level of study (Outcome 3, Point 23 in Outcomes for Graduates (General Medical Council) 2018). KCPT
003 Apply social science principles, method and knowledge to medical practice, as appropriate for this level of study (Outcome 3, Point 24 in Outcomes for Graduates (General Medical Council) 2018). KCPT
004 Apply to medical practice the principles, method and knowledge of population health and the improvement of health and sustainable healthcare, as appropriate for this level of study (Outcome 3, Point 25 in Outcomes for Graduates (General Medical Council) 2018). KCPT
005 Communicate effectively, openly and honestly with patients, advocates and colleagues, as appropriate for this level of study (Outcome 2, Point 10 in Outcomes for Graduates (General Medical Council) 2018). KCPT
006 Carry out an effective consultation with a patient, as appropriate for this level of study (Outcome 2, Point 11 in Outcomes for Graduates (General Medical Council) 2018). KCPT
007 Work collaboratively with patients and colleagues to diagnose and manage clinical presentations safely, as appropriate for this level of study (Outcome 2, Point 12 in Outcomes for Graduates (General Medical Council) 2018). KCPT
008 Perform diagnostic, therapeutic and practical procedures safely and effectively, as appropriate for this level of study (Outcome 2, Point 13 in Outcomes for Graduates (General Medical Council) 2018). KCPT
009 Work collaboratively with patients, advocates and colleagues to make clinical judgements and holistic decisions, as appropriate for this level of study (Outcome 2, Point 14 in Outcomes for Graduates (General Medical Council) 2018). KCPT
010 Make appropriate clinical judgements for patients who are nearing or are at end of life, as appropriate for this level of study (Outcome 2, Point 15 in Outcomes for Graduates (General Medical Council) 2018). KCPT
011 Provide immediate care in medical emergencies, as appropriate for this level of study (Outcome 2, Point 16 in Outcomes for Graduates (General Medical Council) 2018). KCPT
012 Recognise when a patient is deteriorating and take appropriate action, as appropriate for this level of study (Outcome 2, Point 17 in Outcomes for Graduates (General Medical Council) 2018). KCPT
013 Prescribe medications safely, appropriately, effectively and economically, as appropriate for this level of study (Outcome 2, Point 18 in Outcomes for Graduates (General Medical Council) 2018). KCPT
014 Recognise and identify factors that suggest that a patient is vulnerable, as appropriate for this level of study (Outcome 1, Point 7 in Outcomes for Graduates (General Medical Council) 2018). KCPT
015 Use information effectively and safely in a medical context, as appropriate for this level of study (Outcome 2, Point 19 in Outcomes for Graduates (General Medical Council) 2018). KCPT
016 Demonstrate how patient care is delivered in the health service, as appropriate for this level of study (Outcome 3, Point 20 in Outcomes for Graduates (General Medical Council) 2018). KCPT
017 Recognise there are differences in healthcare systems across the four nations of the UK, as appropriate for this level of study (Outcome 3, Point 21 in Outcomes for Graduates (General Medical Council) 2018). KCPT
018 Apply scientific method and approaches to medical research, as appropriate for this level of study (Outcome 3, Point 26 in Outcomes for Graduates (General Medical Council) 2018). KCPT
019 Behave in accordance with Good Medical Practice (General Medical Council) making care of patients their first concern, as appropriate for this level of study (Outcome 1, Point 1 in Outcomes for Graduates (General Medical Council) 2018). KCPT
020 Behave according to ethical and professional principles, as appropriate for this level of study (Outcome 1, Point 2 in Outcomes for Graduates (General Medical Council) 2018). KCPT
021 Demonstrate awareness of the importance of their personal physical and mental wellbeing, as appropriate for this level of study (Outcome 1, Point 3 in Outcomes for Graduates (General Medical Council) 2018). KCPT
022 Demonstrate knowledge of the legal framework of medicine, as appropriate for this level of study (Outcome 1, Point 4 in Outcomes for Graduates (General Medical Council) 2018). KCPT
023 Demonstrate that they can practise safely and improve care, as appropriate for this level of study (Outcome 1, Point 5 in Outcomes for Graduates (General Medical Council) 2018). KCPT
024 Recognise complexity and uncertainty, learning to manage these situations as appropriate for this level of study (Outcome 1, Point 6 in Outcomes for Graduates (General Medical Council) 2018). KCPT
025 Recognise the role of doctors in contributing to the management and leadership of the health service, as appropriate for this level of study (Outcome 1, Point 8 in Outcomes for Graduates (General Medical Council) 2018). KCPT
026 Learn and work effectively within a multi-professional team, as appropriate for this level of study (Outcome 1, Point 9 in Outcomes for Graduates (General Medical Council) 2018). KCPT

Attributes Developed

C - Cognitive/analytical

K - Subject knowledge

T - Transferable skills

P - Professional/Practical skills

Methods of Teaching / Learning

The learning and teaching strategy is designed to:

The programme aims to provide a research and clinical-rich environment that will enable the student to develop into an outstanding medical graduate who is confident and competent to practice in the health service in accordance with the GMC’s Good Medical Practice (2019). The Surrey programme will have particular emphasis on interprofessional and interdisciplinary learning, the application of digital innovation in the health environment together with mental health and wellbeing in society. Our graduates will be prepared for lifelong learning, reflective practice, and prepared to make an effective contribution to continuous quality improvement in the National Health Service (NHS). By the end of the programme our graduates will have achieved/gained:

 

•           Core skills and knowledge to fulfil the role of a Foundation Year 1 Doctor within the NHS

•           Training and education as approved by the General Medical Council

•           Competence in clinical skills

•           Critical and analytical powers in relation to medicine

•           Personal and professional skills

•           Transferable skills for lifelong learning and a career in medicine

•           Opportunities for multidisciplinary learning

•           Communication and team-working skills

Indicated Lecture Hours (which may also include seminars, tutorials, workshops and other contact time) are approximate and may include in-class tests where one or more of these are an assessment on the module. In-class tests are scheduled/organised separately to taught content and will be published on to student personal timetables, where they apply to taken modules, as soon as they are finalised by central administration. This will usually be after the initial publication of the teaching timetable for the relevant semester.

Reading list

https://readinglists.surrey.ac.uk
Upon accessing the reading list, please search for the module using the module code: MED2001

Other information

This is the first year-long module in a 4 year programme with a spiral curriculum. All five pillars of curriculum design are embedded in this module. Learning objectives, methods of teaching/learning and assessment which incorporate each of the pillars are listed below. Digital capabilities: technology enhanced learning opportunities during this module include the preparatory e-learning course, learning anatomy at the Minimal Access Therapy Unit (MATTU) and use of clinical skills learning facilities in the Surrey Clinical Simulation Centre (SC2). Sustainability: During the module students will develop a foundation of understanding Sustainable Healthcare. eg. Learning Outcomes 23 and 25 and during their Special Study Units. Employability: During this module students will begin to develop their understanding of the knowledge, skills and professional attributes required to achieve a Primary Medical Qualification. eg. Learning Outcomes 1, 2, 3, 13, 15, 16, 17, 19 and 22. Global and Cultural Capabilities: As a programme centred on international student recruitment it is expected that students will share experiences and knowledge from their own backgrounds and cultures. They will learn how to respect and value different experiences during their small group learning (Case Based Learning groups) and Special Study Units where the essential skills of teamworking for medical practice will be nurtured by expert facilitators. Learning Outcome 4 will focus on understanding a population (including global) perspective of health and health improvement. Critical thinking will be developed (Learning Outcome 18) and assessed in both formative and summative written and practical clinical assessments. Resourcefulness and Resilience: This module will establish the active and independent learning required for lifelong learning throughout a career in medicine. Multiple Learning Outcomes in this module will cover the knowledge and skills required to demonstrate safe medical practice together with developing an understanding of how to manage personal wellbeing when working in a demanding professional role. (Learning Outcomes 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 14, 20, 21, 24 and 26). Students will be introduced to the concept of using reflection in their studies and future practice. Their Professional Development Groups will provide a supportive environment for learning and throughout the module rapid and constructive feedback from teachers and peers will further enhance opportunities for every student to make progress. Further support for student success in this module is the final two-week study unit to aid transition into the 2nd year Clinical Pathways 1 module.

 

 Additional Costs:

Description

Students should expect to purchase some equipment during their studies, in addition to standard living costs and books, stationery and travel to University. Travel expenses for students attending clinical placements, that are over and above their usual commute to the University, will be reimbursed by the University. Students should expect to have access to a portable device (e.g. mobile phone, tablet) to access their learning, and portfolio once on placement. Many textbooks are accessible to students online, with free access provided by the University.

Category

Uniform: c. £80

Medical Equipment (e.g. Stethoscope): c. £70

Included in fees: No

 

Please note that the information detailed within this record is accurate at the time of publishing and may be subject to change. This record contains information for the most up to date version of the programme / module for the 2025/6 academic year.